Pictured – Surgeon General Luther Terry and the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the United States. Saturday, January 11, 1964.

Dr. Leroy Burney

1957 First Statement by a Surgeon General regarding smoking and health

In 1957 Surgeon General, Dr. Leroy Burney  issues the first official statement regarding smoking and health.

On July 12, 1957, after organizing a group of scientists to appraise 18 studies on smoking and health, Dr. Burney, himself a smoker, issued a report saying,

It is clear that there is an increasing and consistent body of evidence that excessive cigarette smoking is one of the causative factors in lung cancer. ”

Surgeon Genral LutherTerry 1964

1964 Report of the Advisory Committee to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service.

On January 11, 1964, Surgeon General Luther Terry released a historic report to the press implicating cigarette smoking as a cause of lung cancer, heart disease, and chronic bronchitis. A longtime smoker himself, Dr. Terry, along with his Advisory Committee, unveiled Smoking and Health: Report of the Advisory Committee of the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service.

The Public Health Service, scheduled the press conference for a Saturday to help minimize the report’s effect on the stock market. On the basis of more than 7,000 articles relating to smoking and disease already available at that time in the biomedical literature, the Advisory Committee concluded that cigarette smoking is—

        • A cause of lung cancer and laryngeal cancer in men
        • A probable cause of lung cancer in women
        • The most important cause of chronic bronchitis
1964-SGR_cover

The release of the report was the first in a series of steps, still being taken more than 40 years later, to diminish the impact of tobacco use on the health of the American people.

Soon after, the U.S. Congress adopted the Federal Cigarette Labeling and Advertising Act of 1965 and the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act of 1969. These laws—

  • Required a health warning on cigarette packages
  • Banned cigarette advertising in the broadcasting media
  • Called for an annual report on the health consequences of smoking.

In September 1965, the Public Health Service established a small unit called the National Clearinghouse for Smoking and Health. The Clearinghouse and its successor organization, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Office on Smoking and Health, have been responsible for 29 reports on the health consequences of smoking.

Reports of the Surgeon General from 1967 – Current

William H. Stewart, M.D.

William H. Stewart, M.D., Surgeon General of the United States from 1965 to 1969.

1967 – The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Public Health Service Review

1967-SGR-CoverConfirmed and strengthened conclusions of the 1964 report. Stated that “the case for cigarette smoking as the principal cause of lung cancer is overwhelming.” Found that evidence “strongly suggests that cigarette smoking can cause death from coronary heart disease,” which was upgraded from the 1964 conclusion of an “association.” Also concluded that “Cigarette smoking is the most important of the causes of chronic non-neoplastic bronchopulmonary diseases in the United States.”

1968 – The Health Consequences of Smoking: 1968 Supplement to the 1967 Public Health Service Review

1968--SGR-CoverUpdated information that was presented in the 1967 report. Estimated that smoking-related loss of life expectancy among young men as 8 years for “heavy” smokers (more than 2 packs/day) and 4 years for “light” smokers (less than ½ pack/day)

1969 – The Health Consequences of Smoking: 1969 Supplement to the 1967 Public Health Service Review

Also supplemented 1967 report. Confirmed association between maternal smoking and infant low birthweight. Identified evidence of increased incidence of prematurity, spontaneous abortion, stillbirth, and neonatal death (USDHEW 1969).

Jesse Leonard Steinfeld M.D.

Jesse Leonard Steinfeld, M.D., Surgeon General of the United States from 1969 to 1973.

1971 -The Health Consequences of Smoking

1971-SGR-CoverExamined evidence on immunologic effects of tobacco and tobacco smoke, harmful constituents of tobacco smoke, and “public exposure to air pollution from tobacco smoke” (p. 121). Found tobacco and tobacco smoke antigenic in humans and animals; tobacco may impair protective mechanisms of immune system; nonsmokers’ exposure to tobacco smoke may exacerbate allergic symptoms; carbon monoxide in smoke-filled rooms may harm health of persons with chronic lung or heart disease; tobacco smoke contains hundreds of compounds, several of which have been shown to act as carcinogens, tumor initiators, and tumor promoters. Identified carbon monoxide, nicotine, and tar as smoke constituents most likely to produce health hazards of smoking.

1972 – The Health Consequences of Smoking

1972-SGR-CoverThe relationships between cigarette smoking and cancer, cardiovascular disease, and
non-neoplastic bronchopulmonary disease are reviewed and evidence is presented which helps develop our understanding of the mechanisms which are involved in these relationships. In the final three chapters, information is presented on public exposure to air pollution from t.obacco, on the relationship between tobacco and allergy, and on the harmful constituents which are found in cigarette smoke.

Merlin K. DuVal, M.D., Assistant Secretary for Health

Merlin K. DuVal, M.D., Assistant Secretary for Health

1973 -The Health Consequences of Smoking

1973-reports-of-the-Surgeon-GeneralPresented evidence on the health effects of smoking pipes, cigars, and “little cigars.” Found mortality rates of pipe and cigar smokers higher than those of nonsmokers but lower than those of cigarette smokers. Found that cigarette smoking impairs exercise performance in healthy young men. Presented additional evidence on smoking as a risk factor in peripheral vascular disease and problems of pregnancy

Charles Edwards, M.D., Assistant Secretary for Health in the Department of HEW

Charles Edwards, M.D., Assistant Secretary for Health

1974 -The Health Consequences of Smoking

1974-SGR-coverTenth-anniversary report.Reviewed and strengthened evidence on major hazards of smoking. Reviewed evidence on the association between smoking and atherosclerotic brain infarction and on the synergistic effect of smoking and asbestos exposure in causing lung cancer.

Assistant Secretary for Health

Theodore Cooper, M.D., Assistant Secretary for Health

1975 -The Health Consequences of Smoking

1975-SGR-CoverUpdated information on health effects of involuntary (passive) smoking. Noted evidence linking parental smoking to bronchitis and pneumonia in children during the first year of life.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Julius B. Richmond, M.D., United States Surgeon General and the United States Assistant Secretary for Health

1979 -The Health Consequences of Smoking, 1977-1978

Combined 2-year report focused on smoking-related health problems unique to women. Cited studies showing that the use of oral contraceptives potentiates harmful effects of smoking on the cardiovascular system.

1979 -Smoking and Health

1979-SGR-CoverFifteenth-anniversary report. Presented most comprehensive review of health effects of smoking ever published, and first Surgeon General’s report to carefully examine behavioral, pharmacologic, and social factors influencing smoking; to consider the role of adult and youth education in promoting nonsmoking, and to review health consequences of smokeless tobacco. Many new sections, including one identifying smoking as “one of the primary sources of drug interactions in man.” The evidence suggests that mothers who smoke during pregnancy face the possibility of creating long-term, irreversible effects on their babies. As smoking levels among women go up, disease and death rates go up also: lung cancer has increased five-fold among women since 1955. Women who smoke like men die like men who smoke. Sheds new light on dramatically increased risks to smokers exposed to certain occupational hazards. Workers in the asbestos, rubber, coal, textile, uranium, and chemical industries, among others, face these risks. The subject of smoking among children is addressed. The percentage of girls aged 12 to 14 who smoke has increased eight-fold since 1968. Among the age group 13 to 19, there are now 6 million regular smokers. One hundred thousand children under 13 are regular smokers.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Julius B. Richmond, M.D., Surgeon General (Preface) – Chairman, FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

1980 – The Health Consequences of Smoking for Women

1980-SGR-CoverDevoted to health consequences of smoking for women. Reviewed evidence that strengthened previous findings and permitted new ones. Noted projections that lung cancer would surpass breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer mortality in women. The identified trend toward increased smoking by adolescent females.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Julius B. Richmond, M.D., Surgeon General (Preface) – Chairman, FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

1981 – The Health Consequences of Smoking–The Changing Cigarette

1981-SGR-CoverExamined health consequences of “the changing cigarette” (i.e., lower tar and nicotine cigarettes). Concluded that lower yield cigarettes reduced risk of lung cancer, but found no conclusive evidence that they reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, COPD, and fetal damage. Noted possible risks from additives and their products of combustion. Discussed compensatory smoking behaviors that might reduce the potential risk of lower-yield cigarettes. Emphasized that there is no safe cigarette and that any risk reduction associated with lower-yield cigarettes would be small compared with the benefits of quitting smoking.

FAMRI Researcher Authors, Co-Authors, Editors and Reviewers

Julius B. Richmond, M.D., Surgeon General (Preface) – Chairman, FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

David M. Burns, M.D., Scientific Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

The legacy of Dr. Julius B. Richmond, M.D.

Dr. Julius B. Richmond did as much as anyone to protect and improve the health of his fellow citizens, and in particular, children and adolescents, over his long and splendid career.

From 1953 to 1965, Dr. Richmond was chairman and professor of the Department of Pediatrics at the State University of New York, SUNY College of Medicine. He became dean in 1965, serving in that capacity until 1970.

In 1965 Dr. Richmond was appointed by President Johnson as the first national director of Project Head Start in the Office of Economic Opportunity. Head Start became a year-round program after the first summer; approximately 750,000 children are enrolled in Project Head Start each year in about 1,500 centers across the United States. Head Start is a comprehensive child development program.

In 1971 Dr. Richmond was recruited by the Harvard Medical School. He became a professor of psychiatry and human development and chairman and professor of the Department of Social and Preventative Medicine. Simultaneously, he was appointed professor of public health in the School of Public Health at Harvard. While at Harvard, Dr. Richmond was honored to receive a dual presidential appointment as Surgeon General and Assistant Secretary for Health. Both positions required Senate confirmation. Dr. Richmond was the first individual ever selected to occupy both positions. He had the responsibility in the federal public health sector for some 50,000 employees.

During his tenure as Surgeon General, Dr. Richmond focused on tobacco control efforts by publishing the 1979 Surgeon Generals Report, presenting overwhelming scientific evidence of the multiple harms caused by smoking. Dr. Richmond has received several honorary degrees, including Yale and Harvard. He continued his professional activities as the John D. McCarthy Professor of Health Policy Emeritus, monitoring students and colleagues right up until the last couple of months.

He continued to teach and write, striving to shape health policies for health promotion and disease prevention, emphasizing children and families and the low-income population.

Dr. Richmond was a brilliant, caring, hands-on pediatrician for nearly 70 years. In later years, he took on the onerous task of educating the public by testifying in open court about the dangers of tobacco and how the industry had manipulated scientific data for decades. In doing so, Dr. Richmond voluntarily subjected himself to many days of grueling cross-examination, and he did this while refusing to accept compensation as a skilled expert witness.

FAMRI Medical Advisory Board MembersAs Chairman of FA MRI’s Medical Advisory Board, Dr. Richmond was vital to the Board of Trustees in helping to direct over $200,000,000 in grants to some of the finest medical schools and research institutions in America and the world –including five Centers of Excellence. The scientific research aims to eradicate the diseases caused by exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, the money having resulted from a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of non-smoking flight attendants against the tobacco industry.

Dr. Richmond had one of the most extraordinary and productive careers in the history of American monitoring science and public education. His sterling character traits mirrored his professional accomplishments. His sense of humor was legendary, as was his refusal to acknowledge his importance. In addition, he was endlessly patient, civil, tolerant, incredibly well-informed, and a true pleasure to be around.

FAMRI is eternally grateful for Dr. Richmond’s guidance and the pure pleasure of his company and insights.

C. Everett Koop

C. Everett Koop, M.D.,  Surgeon General of the United States.

1982 – The Health Consequences of Smoking – Cancer

1982-SGR CoverCigarette smoking is the major single cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Tobacco’s contribution to all cancer deaths is estimated to be 30 percent. Cigarette smokers have total cancer death rates two times greater than do nonsmokers. Heavy smokers have a three to four times greater excess risk of cancer mortality. There is no single action an individual can take to reduce the risk of cancer more effectively than quitting smoking, particularly cigarettes. Cigarette smoking is a major cause of cancers of the lung, larynx, oral cavity, and esophagus, and is a contributory factor for the development of cancers of the bladder, pancreas, and kidney. The term contributory factor by no means excludes the possibility of a causal role for smoking in cancer of these sites.

FAMRI Researcher Authors, Co-Authors, Editors and Reviewers

David M. Burns, M.D., Scientific Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

1983 The Health Consequences of Smoking–Cardiovascular Disease

1983-SGR-CoverExamined health consequences of smoking for cardiovascular disease. Concluded that cigarette smoking is 1 of 3 major independent causes of CHD and, given its prevalence, “should be considered the most important of the known modifiable risk factors for CHD” (p. 6). Discussed relationships between smoking and other forms of cardiovascular disease.

FAMRI Researcher Authors, Co-Authors, Editors and Reviewers

David M. Burns, M.D., Scientific Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

1984 – The Health Consequences of Smoking–Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease

1984-SGR-CoverReviewed evidence on smoking and COLD. Concluded that smoking is the major cause of COLD, accounting for 80–90% of COLD deaths in the United States. Noted that COLD morbidity has greater social impact than COLD mortality because of extended disability periods of COLD victim.

FAMRI Researcher Authors, Co-Authors, Editors and Reviewers

David M. Burns, M.D., Scientific Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

James L. Repace, Contributor, – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

1985 – The Health Consequences of Smoking–Cancer and Chronic Lung Disease in the Workplace

1985-SGR-CoverExamined relationship between smoking and hazardous substances in the workplace. Found that for the majority of smokers, smoking is a greater cause of death and disability than their workplace environment. Risk of lung cancer from asbestos exposure characterized as multiplicative with smoking exposure. Observed special importance of smoking prevention among blue-collar workers because of their greater exposure to workplace hazards and their higher prevalence of smoking.

FAMRI Researcher Authors, Co-Authors, Editors and Reviewers

David M. Burns, M.D., Scientific Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

1986 – The Health Consequences of Involuntary Smoking

1986-SGR-CoverFocused on involuntary smoking, concluding that “Involuntary smoking is a cause of disease, including lung cancer, in healthy nonsmokers” (p. 7). Also found that, compared with children of nonsmokers, children of smokers have higher incidence of respiratory symptoms and infections and reduced rates of increase in lung function. Presented detailed examination of growth in restrictions on smoking in public places and workplaces. Concluded that simple separation of smokers and nonsmokers within same airspace reduces but does not eliminate exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.

FAMRI Researcher Authors, Co-Authors, Editors and Reviewers

Neal Benowitz, M.D., Contributing Author –Director, FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

David M. Burns, M.D., Scientific Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

James L. Repace, Contributor, – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Nancy Rigotti, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

1988 – The Health Consequences of Smoking–Nicotine Addiction

1988-SGR-CoverEstablished nicotine as a highly addictive substance, comparable in its physiological and psychological properties to other addictive substances of abuse. After carefully examining the available evidence, this Report concludes that:
• Cigarettes and other forms of tobacco are addicting.
• Nicotine is the drug in tobacco that causes addiction.
• The pharmacologic and behavioral processes that determine tobacco addiction are similar to those that determine addiction to drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Gregory N. Connolly, D.M.D., M.P.H., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Michael Cummings, Ph.D. Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished

Ronald M. Davis, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Michael C. Fiore, M.D., Contributing Author – Member – FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

Nancy Rigotti, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Antonia Coello Novello, M.D., Surgeon General of the United States

1990 – The Health Benefits of Smoking Cessation

1990-SGR-CoverExamined how an individual’s risk of smoking-related diseases declines after quitting smoking.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Gregory N. Connolly, D.M.D., M.P.H., Contributor r – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Michael Cummings, Ph.D. Contributor – FAMRI Distinguished

Ronald M. Davis, M.D., Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

M. Joycelyn Elders, M.D., Surgeon General of the United States

1994 -Preventing Tobacco Use Among Young People

Addressed the crucial problems of adolescent tobacco use by providing a detailed look at adolescence, the time of life when most tobacco users begin, develop, and establish their smoking behavior.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Michael Cummings, Ph.D. Contributing Author and Reviewer – FAMRI Distinguished Professor; Member FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

Stanton Glantz, Ph.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Pamela Ling, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee

David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D., Surgeon General of the United States

1998 – Tobacco use among U.S. racial/ethnic minority groups – African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, Hispanics. A Report of the Surgeon General, 1998*

1998-sgr_ethnic_groups_smlDescribed the 4 major U.S. racial/ethnic minority groups—African Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and Hispanics—patterns of tobacco use, adverse health effects, and the effectiveness of interventions in terms of tobacco’s cultural and socioeconomic effects on the members of these groups. This report described the complex factors that play a part in the growing epidemic of diseases caused by tobacco use in these 4 groups.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Neal Benowitz, M.D., Contributing Author –Director, FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

Jonathan Samet, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Michael B. Siegel, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

2000 – Reducing Tobacco Use: a Report of the Surgeon General

2000-SGR-Cover The first report to offer a composite review of the various methods used to reduce and prevent tobacco use. This report evaluated each of the 5 major approaches to reducing tobacco use: educational, clinical, regulatory, economic, and comprehensive.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and
Co-Authors

Michael C. Fiore, M.D., Contributing Editor – Member – FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

Richard A. Daynard, J.D., Ph.D. – Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee

Mark Gottlieb, J.D. – Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee

2001 – Women and Smoking, A Report of the Surgeon General

2002th-womsmk-lrgThis report shines a light on the devastating impact of smoking on women and the need for the Nation to come together and address this problem. Just look at a sample of the statistics summarized in this report.
• An estimated 27,000 more women died of lung cancer than of breast cancer in 2000.
• Three million women have died prematurely because of smoking since 1980, and on average, these women died 14 years prematurely.
• Twenty-two percent of women smoked cigarettes in 1998.
• And 30 percent of high school senior girls reported smoking in the past month, according to recent information.

This report found that women who smoke have a lower bone density and experience a premature decline of lung function. These women also are at increased risk of conception delay and both primary and secondary infertility. For pregnant women who smoke, the risk is increased for low birth weight, perinatal mortality—both stillbirth and neonatal deaths—and sudden infant death syndrome after the child is born.Concluded that the increased likelihood of lung cancer, cardiovascular disease, and reproductive health problems among female smokers make tobacco use a serious women’s health issue.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Neal Benowitz, M.D., Contributing Author – Director, FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

David Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Alex V. Prokhorov, M.D. Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee

Margaret Spitz, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Richard Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., Surgeon General of the United States

2004 – The Health Consequences of Smoking

Concluded that smoking causes diseases in nearly every organ of the body. Also concluded that cigarette smoking is causally linked to leukemia, cataracts, pneumonia, and cancers of the cervix, kidney, pancreas, and stomach.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Mark D. Eisner, M.D., Ph.D., Contributing Author, FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Ira Tager, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

2006 – The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke

2006-SGR-COVERConcluded that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke. Found that even brief secondhand smoke exposure can cause immediate harm. The report said the only way to protect nonsmokers from the dangerous chemicals in secondhand smoke is to eliminate smoking indoors

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Stanton Glantz, Ph.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

  1. Katharine Hammond, Ph.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Stephen S. Hecht, Ph.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Regina Benjamin, M.D., M.B.A., Surgeon General of the United States

2010 – How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease—The Biologic and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease

How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable DiseaseDescribes in detail the specific pathways by which tobacco smoke damages the human body.

 

 

 

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

David Sidransky, M.D., Senior Scientific Editor – Chairman, FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

Neal Benowitz, M.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author -Director, FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

Stephen S. Hecht, Ph.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Nancy Rigotti, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Margaret Spitz, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

2012 – Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults

Updates the 1994 report on youth and described the epidemic of tobacco use among youth 12–17 years of age and young adults 18–25 years of age, including the epidemiology, causes, and health effects of this tobacco use and interventions proven to prevent it.

 

 

 

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

David Sidransky, M.D., Senior Scientific Editor – Chairman, FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

Neal Benowitz, M.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author -Director, FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

Stephen S. Hecht, Ph.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Nancy Rigotti, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Margaret Spitz, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Boris D. Lushniak, M.D., MPH, RADM, Acting Surgeon General of the United States

2014 -50th Anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health

50th Anniversary of the Surgeon General’s Report on Smoking and Health Fiftieth anniversary of the 1964 report on smoking and health.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Neal Benowitz, M.D., Contributing Author – Director, FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

David M. Burns, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

  1. Michael Cummings, Ph.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor, Member FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

Richard A. Daynard, J.D., Ph.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee

Mark D. Eisner, M.D., Ph.D., Contributing Author

Mark Gottlieb, J.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee

Stephen S. Hecht, Ph.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

David T. Levy, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee

Nancy Rigotti, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Steven D. Shapiro, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

David Sidransky, M.D., Contributing Author – Chairman, FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

 

Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A.

Vivek H. Murthy, M.D., M.B.A., Surgeon General of the United States

2016 – E-cigarette Use Among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General

This report highlights what we know and do not know about e-cigarettes. Gaps in scientific evidence do exist, and this report is being issued while these products and their patterns of use continue to change quickly. For example, the health effects and potentially harmful doses of heated and aerosolized constituents of e-cigarette liquids—including solvents, flavorants, and toxicants—are not completely understood. However, although e-cigarettes generally emit fewer toxicants than combustible tobacco products, we know that aerosol from e-cigarettes is not harmless.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Pamela Ling, M.D., Contributing Editor – FAMRI Grantee

Jonathan Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor and Contributing Author – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Mark Travers, M.D., Contributing Author – FAMRI Center of Excellence at UCSF

 

Jerome M. Adams, M.D., M.P.H. Vice Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service Surgeon General of the United States

Jerome M. Adams, M.D., M.P.H. Surgeon General of the United States

2020 – Smoking Cessation: A Report of the Surgeon General

Research, medical advances, and years of documented experience have given us many tools to tackle the tobacco use epidemic in this country. Although quitting smoking can be a difficult process for many smokers, most say they want to quit, and every year more than half make a serious quit attempt. But only a small portion of smokers who try to quit succeed, and only a small portion use any of the tested and proven aids that will significantly increase their chances of success. This Surgeon General’s report on smoking cessation, the 34th report on smoking and health since 1964, examines the most current research on this important issue, identifies barriers to continued success in reducing the prevalence of smoking across all populations, and summarizes evidence-based solutions that can help to eliminate those barriers. Clinical interventions for smoking cessation are critical if we are to achieve our goal of eliminating the devastating effects of smoking on public health. Primary care physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other providers in all medical disciplines and in all healthcare environments should take advantage of these opportunities to inform and encourage smokers to quit. Doing so could enable half a million smokers to quit each year.

FAMRI Researcher Authors and Co-Authors

Smoking Cessation: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2020

Jonathan M. Samet, M.D., Contributing Editor – FAMRI Distinguished Professor

Michael C. Fiore, M.D., Contributing Author – Member, FAMRI Medical Advisory Board

David T. Levy, Contributing Author – FAMRI Grantee